Dr.Jitendra Chowdhary
D.Ortho,DNB (Ortho),MNAMS. Fellow in Joint Replacement USA
+91 99740 87245
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Joint Replacement
 Total Knee Replacement
 Total Hip Replacement
 Total Shoulder Replacement
 Total Elbow Replacement
 Uni Compartmental Replacement
 Knee Arthroscopy
 Autologus Carilage Cell Implantation
 Stem Cell Therapy for Joint Cartilage
 
Total Hip Replacement...
 
 
 
  Hip Replacement is a surgical procedure that relieves pain from most kinds of hip arthritis, improving the quality of life for the large majority of patients who undergo the operation to Hip Replacement. Patients commonly undergo THR after non-operative treatments (such as activity modifications, medications for pain or inflammation, or use of a cane) have failed to provide relief from arthritis symptoms For Hip Replacement In India.
 
  Most scientific studies that have followed patients for more than 10 years have found "success rates" of 90 percent or more following traditional THR. Distilled to its essentials, THR involves surgically removing the arthritic parts of the Hip Replacement(cartilage and bone), replacing the "ball and socket" part of the joint with artificial components made from metal alloys, and placing high-performance bearing surface between the metal parts.
Most commonly, the bearing surface is made from a very durable polyethylene plastic, but other materials (including ceramics, newer plastics, or metals) have been used. Patients typically spend a few days in the hospital after the procedure (5 to 10 days is most typical), and some patients benefit from a short inpatient stay in a rehabilitation facility after that to help transition back to living independently at home. Most patients will walk with a walker or crutches for 4 to 6 weeks, most will use a cane for another 4 to 6 weeks after that; after that, the large majority of patients are able to walk freely. A bewildering number of different implant designs, bearing surface materials, and surgical approaches have been tried to achieve one seemingly straightforward goal: improving the quality of life for patients who have hip arthritis. As with any important life decision, it makes good sense to get educated on those issues as they pertain to your hip.
 
 
 
How does the hip normally work?
  The hip joint is one of the true ball-and-socket joints of the body. The hip socket is called the acetabulum and forms a deep cup that surrounds the ball of the upper thigh bone, known as the femoral head. The thick muscles of the buttock at the back and the thick muscles of the thigh in the front surround the hip. The surface of the femoral head and the inside of the acetabulum are covered with articular cartilage. This material is about one-quarter of an inch thick in most large joints. Articular cartilage is a tough, slick material that allows the surfaces to slide against one another without damage.
How should I prepare for surgery?
  The decision to proceed with surgery should be made jointly by you and your surgeon only after you feel that you understand as much about the procedure as possible. Once the decision to proceed with surgery is made, several things may need to be done. Your orthopaedic surgeon may suggest a complete physical examination by your medical or family doctor. This is to ensure that you are in the best possible condition to undergo the operation. You may also need to spend time with the physical therapist who will be managing your rehabilitation after the surgery. One purpose of the preoperative physical therapy visit is to record a baseline of information. This includes measurements of your current pain levels, functional abilities, and the movement and strength of each.
  A second purpose of the preoperative therapy visit is to prepare you for your upcoming surgery. You will begin to practice some of the exercises you will use just after surgery. You will also be trained in the use of either a walker or crutches. Whether the surgeon uses a cemented or uncemented approach may determine how much weight you will be able to apply through your foot while walking.
 
  This procedure requires the surgeon to open up the hip joint during surgery. This puts the hip at some risk for dislocation after surgery. To prevent dislocation, patients follow strict guidelines about which hip positions to avoid (called hip precautions ). Your therapist will review these precautions with you during the preoperative visit and will drill you often to make sure you practice them at all times for at least six weeks. Some surgeons give the OK to discontinue the precautions after six to 12 weeks because they feel the soft tissues have gained enough strength by this time to keep the joint from dislocating. You may be asked to donate some of your own blood before the operation. This blood can be donated three to five weeks before the operation, and your body will make new blood cells to replace the loss in Hip Replacement.At the time of the operation, if you need to have a blood transfusion you will receive your own blood back from the blood bank. Ruby Hall Blood Bank is situated in the basement of the hospital and all enquiries can be made for further clarification.
 
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